Lessons From The Omelet

Part 1 of 2 Lessons From The Omelet

“Thinking Global Acting Local” is the theme of the Spring 2011 Semester at Sea voyage around the world. The Term “Glocal” is a hybrid word coming from the combination of taking global ideas to a local level.

We are 30 days into the voyage now and I am starting to connect the dots around the world without emotions. Saying there is an adjustment to traveling on a ship with 700 other people is an understatement. The diverse group of learners from all over the world has been an interesting study of human nature. Each day I am learning more from the individuals and from the ports so it’s all part of life and the lessons it has to give.

The lessons are still the lessons and I was so happy to learn the Lesson of the rainforest in Dominica and the 18 Mile Rule™ in Brazil. Could it be we have about completed 9 of the 18 miles in the last 30 days and a balance is starting to appear? I am thinking we are about half way there and the dots are starting to connect.

The lesson of the Omelets are ready to be shared.

The ship, MV Explorer, embarked from Nassau, Bahamas on January 12, 2011. My husband Tom and I arrived in Nassau a day early to be sure we were rested and ready to embrace all the “glocal” lessons we could absorb. Being in a receptive state of mind heightens the consciousness for the lessons that are right there. Without a conscious state of awareness the lessons can just slip by and the feeling of the experience is just going through the motions to get through an event. By putting on the receptivity hat, the trip continues to be stimulating as the awareness heightens on a daily basis. The ability to listen more intently, picking up on trends, actually feeling the moods of the people and the surroundings becomes a new world with intense opportunities to learn. The hotel we were staying at provided us two free breakfast buffets because of some room issues whichOmlete will be another post involving the bar of expectations and quality.

While standing in the line to have an omelet prepared I heard the cook ask a man in line if he was having a good time. The man answered “yes I am.” The cook then inquired “when will you be coming back to Nassau?” to which the man responded “well I need to get home first then think about it.” The cook then suggested “why don’t you come back for the super bowl, we are going to have many fun events and it will be a great time.” The thoughts came rushing in with wonder how an individual preparing an omelet would be such a great public relations person for the hotel in talking with the guests and closing n another stay.

The global lesson started to crystallize as I reflected on conversations with the taxi drivers, the door men, the restaurant host and wait staff. Everyone we had come in contact with had a smile and was asking how our stay was going. It became clear that Nassau, as a country or community, was dedicated to encourage tourism and help make the guest feel welcome and appreciated. Taking this concept to the local level it became evident that to create an environment where visitors want to come back and tell their friends about their stay in a particular location the entire community needs to be on board to make the visit pleasant no matter what facet of the town they encounter.

Taking the global message from Nassau right back to our local communities made the experience of the omelet a “glocal” lesson that expanded as we encountered engagement with the locals. Ambassadors of tourism Downtown we encountered tourism help from women in neon vests eager to help make our time in Nassau enjoyable. The question arises “Is the local government involved with this dedication to creating a memorable experience for the visitors or is it just “free trade” at work?” I had the distinct feeling of “big brother watching” as we navigated the area and thinking that would be great content for some investigative reporting.

The experience in Nassau has stimulated a desire for me to research how local communities can come together economically and from the heart for the common cause of sharing the love of their land with others coming to visit, work or live. Let’s ponder together, how do we take this global concept local? Is there any way possible our local Chamber of Commerce can work with the community to support one another in expressing joy to visitors and sharing the love of the individual cities and towns? Can we encourage local citizens to smile and engage with visitors to share the hometown feeling of a group of people living and working together with a common goal of survivalin changing economic times? Is it possible in our individual communities that even the person making omelets is concerned about the experience a visitor is having?

Williams, Arizona is the “Gateway to the Grand Canyon” and the community where my husband and I reside. We are going to take this lesson of the omelets to embrace each and every visitor we encounter on the street to be an ambassador of good will for the community we share.

Glocal lesson #5 think global and act local, going “glocal” with omelets.

Check back later for part 2.

Be sure to register to play the “where in the world game” if you have not registered!

About Carra Riley

Fun loving classic writer who is a life long learner. Helping people connect the dots as a consultant for small business and real estate along with custom workshops and seminars.

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