What is with your orange? Glocal #7


Welcome to Day one on the voyage for “Connecting The Dots Around The World.”

“How can this be?” you may be asking as today is actually the 52nd day of travel on the MV Explorer.  Mental transformation proceeds on different paths with each individual and it has taken me this much time to process the information and share it in a way that makes sense and will have a positive impact as we “Think Global and Act Local”  going “Glocal.” To prepare for a mid-voyage review I took a step back to review where we came from and compare where we are, setting the first day stage:

“Anxious whispers filled the room in the student union as voyagers anticipated the key note address for the Spring 2011 voyage of Semester At Sea. The thought of 104 days on the open seas, engaging with people in communities all over the world was daunting.  How would I know what messages to listen to? How would I decipher all the visual and audio stimulation I which I would experience and use it as a learning tool?  How will I know if I “Get It?”  What will I feel?  Will the dots connect?  Will the puzzle pieces fit?  These are questions swimming through the minds of many on the ship so the importance of the initial message was one that would set the tone and expectations for the passage.”

C.Y. Tung,  one of the visionaries behind Semester At Sea said, “Ships can carry more than cargo. They can carry ideas.”

To that end I embarked upon a global path with no obligations, no stress and a total open mind to absorb and engage in stimulating conversation to help connect the dots around the world. Completely void of any ties or worries, produced an environment perfect for a type of “scientific research” where were no external factors that could obscure the message. My mind was an open book ready to write the chapters after each port or life changing event.  The bar of expectations for the experience on the ship was at the very top level.  The marketing “hooks” had me ready, hook, line and sinker for somewhat of a utopia in travel and education.  The superiority of the instructors, the course selections, the student body composition, the quality of the ship itself all were framed in marketing perfection.  I drank the Kool-Aid and was ready for the ride to become “grounded at sea.”

Rosalyn Berne, Vice President of Academic Affairs for the Institute for Shipboard Education and Semester at Sea, spoke to the Spring 2011 voyage participants about embracing the newness of everything and what we were about to experience. She asked us to close our eyes and visualize…….

“Pretend you have one orange and there is one orphan child looking at you on a bench, you start to open the orange…… what are you going to do with the orange?  Now 7 orphan children appear…  again the question arises, what are you going to do with the orange… as you break off one section.. a hundred orphans show up… what will you do?”

Pregnant pause…. that was it, she was done and the next speaker was walking to the stage.

“What is up with your orange?” will be the theme and deep question to ponder throughout the voyage for me.  The sensation in my stomach after her speech was something I was not prepared for as I had no clue what I would do with my orange. Originally thoughts of sharing the orange popped into my head but once the 100 orphans came out I became uncomfortable in my thoughts as the reality of world hunger started to set in. The question then arose about my one orange and what I could do to help.  We have encountered hundreds of hungry children on this voyage so far and the answer to the questions seems to change or evolve after each port.  It will be interesting to compare ideas on how to “Connect The Dots Around The World” once the voyage is totally complete.

Going back to the orientation event, potent information was provided by Dean Dan Garvey describing the hypothesis of why some of us were on the ship.

  • Some are here to meet people and travel.
  • Some people see life as a great charm bracelet and want the charm that says “I sailed around the world.”
  • Some are just getting out of relationships and some want in a relationship.
  • Some are here because their sorority or fraternity said it was a good thing to do.
  • Some are trying to answer “WHO AM I?” and where do I fit in.

Out of nowhere we hear the clear sound of one note ringing in the auditorium.  The addition of a second note peaks our interest, then many notes just hap hazard are being played with no association.  The notes then evolve into a beautiful melody, setting the tone of “harmony” which is ultimately one of the goals for the voyage according to Dean Dan.

“Take aways” from the orientation included the fact responsibility comes along with this adventure if we accept it. We are the custodians of our stories both the successes and the regrets.

I created the Dean Dan Top Ten list from the ship orientation speech.

  1. Traveling around the world is an opportunity to be one of the most transformational times of life.
  2. It can also be an opportunity for huge regret if one misses doing things or experiences for growth in exchange for momentary instant gratification.
  3. Let the experience to light a fire to become a positive influence on the world.
  4. Become a citizen of this planet without regret.
  5. Never say, I wish I had listened, I wish I had spent a little less time at the Hilton.
  6. Adults have been coaching you since you were little, you know what to do, just do it.
  7. Make sure you have no regrets.
  8. Look forward to the unknown opportunities.
  9. Don’t be a distraction to others who want to learn.
  10. Honor everyone else who is here.

The orange messed with my mind or should I describe it as “stimulated contemplation.” The orange has been the topic of many conversations on the voyage as we individually figure out what to do with that fruit.  The door of thought was opened but no directions were given or alluded to including what could potentially happen if you turn right or left in thought so it is up to the “thinker” to figure out how all the dots connect and the ultimate outcome for the orange. The ship is filled with “serious thinkers in the form of both students and educators” which gives a good cross section of some of the most brilliant minds in the country. The voyage has turned out to be more of an “independent study” instead of a community project. Having access to the intellectual resources is making the journey an easy place to learn.  Each individual is learning or absorbing the lessons from around the world at their own pace and under their own terms.

Several insightful ideas came from posting the orange question on facebook:

  • Eat the orange and plant the seeds.
  • Take the orphans to the orange tree itself.
  • Pray, like the loaves, fishes and wine to feed the multitude.
  • Eat the orange and run.
  • Make juice.
  • Teach the orphans how to plant an orchard.

Contemplating the orange, opened thought for new ideas like, connecting the dash in life with specific purpose. Could it be the “dash” on the tombstone showing the material start and end of a life answers what you did with your orange?  Does discovering passion in your dash evolve into “Who Am I” and what did I do to make the world a better place?
Is there a right or wrong answer? Do you share the orange, give it all to one, eat the orange, plant the seeds, graft a tree, create juice or run away?  There are certainly many choices of what to do with the one orange. What is right for one individual might not be right for another.  It really does not matter what your answer is because, your dash, is your dash and you have control over what you do in life to make a difference in the world.

Connecting the dots around the world with global ideas that can be implemented at the local levels is what “Glocal” lessons are all about.

What are you going to do with your orange?

What difference can be made in individual communities?  How can others be encouraged to help with local issues?  The world is a big place and the backyard is a step away.

Going Glocal, connecting our local communities with global lessons.

Glocal #6 Part 2 Lesson of the Omelet

Glocal Lesson Of The Omelets Part 1

The rest of the story….not having a camera available for the “photo op” at the omelet bar in Nassau where I experienced part 1 of the lesson of the omelets led me to re-create the situation at a later date to have digital images for the “glocal” moment. While staying in the rain forest on the Amazon above Manaus, Brazil the opportunity arose to capture the “lesson of the omelet” in the Amazon Eco Park at the breakfast buffet. The photo of the omelet with the man behind the stove possibly shows the sentiment of some of the residents along with the local actions reported in a newspaper article. You can be the judge of the lesson of the lesson of the omelet in Manaus, Brazil.

It has taken me some time to publish this post as I was not sure how to represent the other side of “Connecting The Dots Around The World.” When I embarked on this journey around the world, I had some kind of “Polly Anna” idea that there would be some mystic revelations and everything would be positive and would write as PF Kluge shared in a Global Studies class on the ship “Happy Yappy” reports. PF Kluge is an instructor on thevoyage around the world and has been described on his website as “Novelist, journalist, professor: a trifecta, a hat trick, a trinity.” He tells it like it is and minces no words. He co-authored the “Life” magazine article that was the basis of the movie “Dog Day Afternoon.”

After some deep contemplation of the experience in Manaus it appeared as though there are mixed messages from the government vs. the people. Manaus had to hire security and 5 extra agents to be “present” by the dock as the ship community walked around. An article indicating “Students Pay $300 Per Day To Learn About The World” can’t be located online in the January 25, 2011 Amazonas em Tempo newspaper. The Newspaper article was shared in a journalism class on the ship as the students had to bring articles in from the ports to discuss in class. Where did the online article go?  Could it be that public sentiment might not be what Brazil should be publishing with the current world events coming to the country?  What did that headline say to the people of Manaus?  According to a text book we are using on the ship for our daily global studies class “Atlas of Global Development” a poverty map indicates 10 to 24% of the population in Brazil lives on less than $1.25 per day?

It appears as through Brazil is working hard to change the past image with street violence and life in the favelas.

Our group had different Manaus experiences with street people attempting to take jewelry right off the neck of a lifelong learner.

Several students were bitten or scratched by monkey’s and had to have rabbi shots after being attacked in the lobby of a hotel with pet monkey’s running around.

There was an encounter with a stalker following a group of three women. Nothing happened as the man went off after being confronted, however, it appeared as though he had a gun under his shirt in his back pocket as he walked away.

A student shared an incident where a bus driver took the long way around back to town which included an unscheduled stop for lunch and an accident dragging a woman on the ground as the bus took off where he then had to get off the bus and get on a different bus as the bus driver took the woman to the hospital.

Five days in Manaus, Brazil seemed like a long time when one of the University officials on the ship indicated in a pre-port lecture, 2 days was enough for Manaus.

Our visit might have been a beta test for things to come in Brazil. One newspaper article reports: “As Brazil prepares to host the 2016 Olympics and the 2014 World Cup, the country expects nothing short of an urban renaissance.”

Brazil is preparing for The world cup in Manaus in four years and in eight years Rio will host the Olympics.

The PR blitz has started and it appeared as we could have been the recipients of practice for the future. In describing preparations for the arrival of the MV Explorer, the local paper, “A Critical,” expressed the fact the Military Police had security and five agents to monitor activities at the port. They also referred to the ship as a “luxury hotel” could this  have possibly been an indication of the “back story” of the Brazilian attitudes about the visitors with the need for protection along with the interesting description of the ship.

The Newspaper article from “A Critical”  was in Portuguese.

“O navio está em Manaus desde a manhã de ontem, e os visitantes foram recepcionados por um grupo de dança folclórica. ‘Estaremos à disposição dos estudantes’, informou o diretor de turismo da Amazonastur, Jordan Gouvêa. Em Manaus, o grupo de universitários terá segurança garantida pela Polícia Militar, que destacou cinco agentes para acompanhar as atividades no porto.

Translated to English:

“The ship is in Manaus since yesterday morning, and visitors were greeted by a folk dance group. ‘We will be available to students,’ the tourism director of AmazonasTur, Jordan Gouvea. In Manaus, the group of students will have security provided by the Military Police, said that five agents to monitor activities at the port. “

More in Portuguese:

“Liberdade de escolha A coordenadora de extensão Debbie Clifford foi quem levou a equipe de A CRÍTICA para conhecer o navio, que mais parece um hotel de luxo e cuja língua oficial é o inglês. ‘A viagem dura 104 dias, portanto tem de tudo aqui’, explicou, contando que no MV Explorer há desde salas de aula, até um deck com piscina, além de refeitórios e quartos. Em solo amazônico, os alunos terão por volta de 35”\

English translation:

“Freedom of choice The extension coordinator Debbie Clifford was the one who led the team of A CRITICAL to meet the ship, which looks more like a luxury hotel and whose official language is English. “The trip lasts 104 days, so it has everything here,” he said, noting that since the MV Explorer for classrooms up to a deck with swimming pool, and dining areas and bedrooms. In Amazonian soil, students will have around 35 activities.”

Connecting the lesson of the Omelet, taking the global thinking to local action, going glocal.

Before docking at our first port, a camera etiquette lesson was provided to the ship community emphasizing  the importance of requesting permission to take photos in the countries we were visiting. Being a respectful student, the omelet man at the Amazon Eco Park was asked if it would be possible to photograph an omelet prior to actually taking the picture. He indicated it would be ok and stepped back from the omelet pan. The photo was taken quickly to get out of the way. When the photos was being cropped the real sentiment of the worker in Brazil at the Amazon Eco Park became evident with his hand gesture.

The article along with the local comments online indicate the feelings of the community. Thinking global and acting local, this representation of the community is a reminder that people are watching what a community does to respond to visitors.

Visitors look at what is going on in an area, what is being written in the newspaper and then make their decisions as to what direction they will take with coming back or sharing the experience with friends.

Learning from the omelet maker in Nassau and the gentleman above shows the WORLD his feelings. The action has an effect on how a visitors perceive the area.

The Amazon Eco Lodge rain forest jungle experience was all good! We had a very knowledgeable guide and pleasant memories. We learned how to survive with water from a parasite root, create poison darts from palm tree spikes an special moss along with making fire torches from the sap of a camphor tree. Our guide was delightful, he loved his land and shared that with us. We caught a piranha and one of the guides caught a caiman alligator so we had a great Amazon rain forest experience. Would I tell someone to visit to Manaus, Brazil?  You be the judge!

The “glocal” lesson of the omelet is to embrace those visiting your community anywhere in the world with kindness and respect. Everyone in the community needs to be on board as the message is coming across loud and clear.  Community involvement and individual dedication to the economic survival of the area or even an individual business is a must to change perceptions and attract new immersion from those testing the waters and looking to see what the location has to offer.

Remember, the actions within a community express the attitude of your environment. Be like the omelet lady from Nassau. Embrace all visitors with appreciation for their participation in your community if you want the local area to grow and prosper together.

Don’t forget to “Get in the game” as there is plenty of time. Win a travel voucher and great prizes to one of the seven wonders of the world. This is an exciting opportunity to experience  Williams, Arizona, The Gateway to the Grand Canyon, a town that embraces its visitors and wants to create a memorable experience so you will be sure to tell your friends about the Grand Canyon and all it’s grandeur.

Lessons From The Omelet

Part 1 of 2 Lessons From The Omelet

“Thinking Global Acting Local” is the theme of the Spring 2011 Semester at Sea voyage around the world. The Term “Glocal” is a hybrid word coming from the combination of taking global ideas to a local level.

We are 30 days into the voyage now and I am starting to connect the dots around the world without emotions. Saying there is an adjustment to traveling on a ship with 700 other people is an understatement. The diverse group of learners from all over the world has been an interesting study of human nature. Each day I am learning more from the individuals and from the ports so it’s all part of life and the lessons it has to give.

The lessons are still the lessons and I was so happy to learn the Lesson of the rainforest in Dominica and the 18 Mile Rule™ in Brazil. Could it be we have about completed 9 of the 18 miles in the last 30 days and a balance is starting to appear? I am thinking we are about half way there and the dots are starting to connect.

The lesson of the Omelets are ready to be shared.

The ship, MV Explorer, embarked from Nassau, Bahamas on January 12, 2011. My husband Tom and I arrived in Nassau a day early to be sure we were rested and ready to embrace all the “glocal” lessons we could absorb. Being in a receptive state of mind heightens the consciousness for the lessons that are right there. Without a conscious state of awareness the lessons can just slip by and the feeling of the experience is just going through the motions to get through an event. By putting on the receptivity hat, the trip continues to be stimulating as the awareness heightens on a daily basis. The ability to listen more intently, picking up on trends, actually feeling the moods of the people and the surroundings becomes a new world with intense opportunities to learn. The hotel we were staying at provided us two free breakfast buffets because of some room issues whichOmlete will be another post involving the bar of expectations and quality.

While standing in the line to have an omelet prepared I heard the cook ask a man in line if he was having a good time. The man answered “yes I am.” The cook then inquired “when will you be coming back to Nassau?” to which the man responded “well I need to get home first then think about it.” The cook then suggested “why don’t you come back for the super bowl, we are going to have many fun events and it will be a great time.” The thoughts came rushing in with wonder how an individual preparing an omelet would be such a great public relations person for the hotel in talking with the guests and closing n another stay.

The global lesson started to crystallize as I reflected on conversations with the taxi drivers, the door men, the restaurant host and wait staff. Everyone we had come in contact with had a smile and was asking how our stay was going. It became clear that Nassau, as a country or community, was dedicated to encourage tourism and help make the guest feel welcome and appreciated. Taking this concept to the local level it became evident that to create an environment where visitors want to come back and tell their friends about their stay in a particular location the entire community needs to be on board to make the visit pleasant no matter what facet of the town they encounter.

Taking the global message from Nassau right back to our local communities made the experience of the omelet a “glocal” lesson that expanded as we encountered engagement with the locals. Ambassadors of tourism Downtown we encountered tourism help from women in neon vests eager to help make our time in Nassau enjoyable. The question arises “Is the local government involved with this dedication to creating a memorable experience for the visitors or is it just “free trade” at work?” I had the distinct feeling of “big brother watching” as we navigated the area and thinking that would be great content for some investigative reporting.

The experience in Nassau has stimulated a desire for me to research how local communities can come together economically and from the heart for the common cause of sharing the love of their land with others coming to visit, work or live. Let’s ponder together, how do we take this global concept local? Is there any way possible our local Chamber of Commerce can work with the community to support one another in expressing joy to visitors and sharing the love of the individual cities and towns? Can we encourage local citizens to smile and engage with visitors to share the hometown feeling of a group of people living and working together with a common goal of survivalin changing economic times? Is it possible in our individual communities that even the person making omelets is concerned about the experience a visitor is having?

Williams, Arizona is the “Gateway to the Grand Canyon” and the community where my husband and I reside. We are going to take this lesson of the omelets to embrace each and every visitor we encounter on the street to be an ambassador of good will for the community we share.

Glocal lesson #5 think global and act local, going “glocal” with omelets.

Check back later for part 2.

Be sure to register to play the “where in the world game” if you have not registered!

Connecting The Dots Around The World With Coffee

Confronting The Coffee Crises:

On our way to Brazil, the largest coffee exporter in the world, we had the opportunity to listen to Lee Gross explain his Masters research on small scale coffee production in the Dominican Republic. We are traveling down the Amazon River on the ML Explorer with the Spring 2011 Semester At Sea voyage learning new concepts from the theme: Thinking Globally to Acting Locally on a daily basis.

Lee Gross sharing research on Spring 2011 Semester At Sea

The information Lee shared was really an awakening for me to really embrace the concept of supporting  “Certified Fair Trade” products.

I must admit I have been on the outside looking in with really understanding the importance of using my consumer dollar to support the environment and small scale farming families. Lee’s presentation “connected the dots” for me in understanding why we should buy “Certified Fair Trade” products.
Interesting facts about coffee production:
• 25 million families are “sustained” by coffee and its connected production products
• Shade grown coffee helps with soil conservation, provides habitat for bird life and consumptive fruits to families
• Brazil produces 1/3 of the world’s coffee
• Small production farms would be the size of a backyard in an American subdivision.
• Coffee is handpicked by millions of laborers and grows in remote mountainous areas. The largest cost to bring the coffee to market is the transportation by mule to the cooperative and export overseas
• Coffee is harvested only one time a year which creates a cash flow problem for small farmers
• Coffee is the 2nd most traded commodity in the world behind OIL
• Most small coffee growers receive $1 to $1.40 per pound
• President John F. Kennedy started the ICA International Coffee Agreement regulating coffee prices
• In 1989 the ICA was terminated which has resulted in an extremely volatile coffee market
• It takes 5-7 years from planting a coffee tree to harvest
• Farmers have all the risk with weather, disease and pests
• 63% of the coffee market is controlled by 5 big corporations: ie. Kraft, Proctor & Gamble, Nestles, Tchibo. who in 2001 at the heart of the coffee crisis experienced significant earnings
• Coffee can be differentiated through specialty coffee organizations, which purchase the highest quality coffee i.e. Starbucks, Green Mountain, Cooperative Coffees, Peats Coffee. Coffee can also be differentiated by purchasing single origin coffees
• Fair Trade is a certification, which ensures that farmers are paid a minimum price ($1.38-$1.50) plus a social premium for good practices, democracy in organization and additional premiums for organic production. Coffee by any roaster can be Fair Trade certified
• Certified Fair Trades growers have to produce products under specific condition to obtain the certification
• Many developing countries spend more in military expenses than in the education of their people
• There is no incentive to grow organic so only the consumer can help the farmers by paying more for certified products
• Organic certifications certify the productions method
• Fair Trade certifications certify the process of trade (i.e. labor practices, minimum price, transparency, etc.
• Many farmers do not have title to their land and cannot obtain loans
How can you help make a difference in supporting small farmers?  Follow the links below for a cliff note lesson!

1. Read about the Certified Fair Trade products, Specialty Coffees and Relationship Coffees. Don’t buy coffee in a can. Know where it comes from and that workers were paid a fair price. Buy certified and single origin coffees. Be a conscious consumer, your dollar speaks!

2. Be willing to pay more to help the environment and sustainability of the world. Support companies who can ensure transparency in process, social and environmental best practices.
3. Learn more about injustice happening everywhere and share with your friends.

Coffee bean sorting

When I posted information about the class and helping small coffee growers on facebook the first person to comment was my friend Sadie Harris from France. She has been buying Certified Fair Trade products for years and makes a conscious effort to support the movement. Many Europeans are acutely aware of how this impacts the world. Traveling around the world, learning from educators in all fields of sustainability is certainly helping me connect more dots!  We are taking the global lessons and applying them to our local practices!

One person DOES make a difference and if that person shares with one other person who becomes aware of the environment and injustice then modifies their buying behavior the world can change. Remember to Buy Certified Fair Trade Products!

I am excited to hear back from you!  Read all the links and then let us know how it touched your life and what you are doing to share?

This post took days to finish with the bad Internet connection so thank you for your patience!  More to come Connecting The Dots Around The World!  Be sure to check out the contest to visit one of the seven wonders of the world!

Global Realities Shared On The Ship!

The transformational trip of a lifetime is starting to set in as a “reality” after being at sea for 6 days on the round the world voyage with Semester At Sea.  Global “realities” are being shared on the ship that have already started to stimulate the consciousness of individuals in our local ship community.

Dominica, was the first port of call and there were some special lessons in the rainforest from a guide who loves and listens to the land.  His bonding with the land made him keenly aware of what “was possible” to those looking on the outside in.

Organic farming and herbology were two other aspects of sustainability we investigated in this emerging Island.  My “take away” from Dominica was to implement a composting plan in my back yard to do my part in making a difference and to ALWAYS remember the lesson of the guide in believing that something is possible when it appears to be impossible. Follow us for daily insight as we learn together how to navigate different situations and “connect the dots around the world. “

Traveling around the world with a group of 605 college students, 66 lifelong learners and 70 TOP EDUCATORS has built up HIGH expectations of a “transformational” voyage. Speaking with new people every day at meal time creates opportunities to learn and share with one another like none other we have ever experienced.  Taking classes, observing in the Field  Programs, listening to speakers who are on the ship to share how they are making a difference in the world one  person at at time and explaining how they accomplished it leaves little time to post on my blog and process all that is going on. Today we had a message that moved me to tears at least three times.

JEFFREY A. KOTTLER, Ph.D. Professor of Psychology was our speaker in Global Studies class today.

Dr. Jeffrey A. Kottler

He  has written over 80 books including a recent New York Times best seller  “The Last Victim: Inside the Minds of Serial Killers”  which is now a movie produced by Clark Peterson who also produced the film, Monster. The film “Dear Mr. Gacy” earned an Academy Award for best actress.

The thought provoking question of the day for me was:

“Would you sell your daughter to avoid starving?”

Most people reading this post will never have to answer that question but there are millions around the world that have to make the decision on a daily basis.

  • The average family in Nepal makes only $210 per year.
  • The cost to buy uniforms and eat at school is $50.00 per year.
  • A family with 4 or 5 children has to decide who can go to school and survive and who will have to be “taken by an employer” to survive on their own.
  • The parent does not know what will become of the girls “taken by an employer” they are simply hoping they can eat.
  • The life span of a girl taken into “sex slavery” by an “employer”  is about 3 years before they die from aids.
  • Many of the girls are raped 10 to 12 times on their first day in service.
  • Men with aids in the culture think that having sex with a virgin could possibly cure them of aids.

Dr. Kottler spoke on “Promoting Social Justice.” His accounts of helping save the lives of two specific girls are an inspiration to all.  Now through his program he is helping over 150 Nepali girls and keeping them from disappearing into sex slavery.  $50.00 initially saved Inu Pavivar from being sold into sex slavery and allowed her to attend school in her village. Her story stimulated a movement called “Empower Nepali Girls Foundation.”  Dr. Kottler ultimately had to go back each year to check on her to make sure the $50.00 was being spent on her education and NOT lining the pockets of some other entity.  This is a true success story and now….

Inu Pariyar, our first student to receive a university scholarship, working in the media and radio studio at Rangsit University in Thailand. She is studying communication and media, fields that are especially impoverished in her own country of Nepal.”

The life of another young girl with a deadly infection on her face was saved for $14.00. Dr. Kottler’s message helped us see how important small donations can be when they are given to the right organizations.   Read more details at Empower Nepali Girls Foundation.

More important facts:

* Facebook group is open to join: Empower Nepali Girls Foundation

* Empower Nepali Girls Foundation is a grassroots in that we have no paid staff and no office.  Everyone pays           their own expenses; that means that 90% of money donated goes DIRECTLY to keep a lower caste girl in               school and prevents her being sold into sex slavery.

* There are 12,000 Nepali girls each year sold into slavery.

*  The foundation visits every girl’s home, every year to make sure she’s okay, has enough to eat, and that her        family supports the education.

*  The group is currently supporting over 150 girls

*  $125 keeps a girl in primary or secondary school for a year!

*  As the girls get older and begin university and technical and medical school, the cost jumps to about $3,000  per girl per year.

*  The group operates in 9 different villages in the most remote, neglected parts of the country of Nepal.

Jeffery Kottler Ph.D. asks introspective questions that when answered might help change the world:

“What is it that leads people to help others, even when they do so at great personal sacrifice?

What is it that motivates you to reach out to others in need?

How are those involved in social justice and altruistic projects transformed by their experiences?”

PLEASE, access all the links in this post and discover how rewarding it is to serve others. and think about how you can make a difference in your own community or around the world.

  • When you give your time and energy you are sharing an integral part of yourself.
  • You are helping people not part of a tribe.
  • It is hard work and a selfless act taking your time and energy to give to others.

Thank you, JEFFREY A. KOTTLER, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, Spring 2011Semester at Sea for showing us the way that one person can make a huge difference.