Winner of “Where in the world is Carra Riley”

First and foremost a HUGE thank you to all the participants in this fun game around the world!

My foursquare updates on twitter are taking on a new meaning as I “think global and act local.”

What an experience it was to voyage around the world with friends in the Cosmic Cow Pie!

It is hard express in words how meaningful your comments and participation were as we were out in the middle of the ocean with no old friends or family on the ship.  We did make new friends but seeing your happy faces on facebook, twitter, flickr and youtube really did make us feel like you were on there with us!

Some of the time things were really not pleasant and even kept me from writing as much as I would have liked to.  Seeing you out there in cyberspace made me FEEL that you were there in thought, supporting and nurturing the trip.  I thank you from the bottom of my heart for your time and sharing along the way.  I will be sending all of the participants the newly launched e-book Cosmic Shift Happens along with many cyber hugs for your kindness!  Your comments, sincerely made a difference! When the book new book “Cosmic Cow Pie…Connecting The Dots Around The World” is complete you will also receive a signed copy of the book and an invitation to the e-launch party when it comes out!  Thank you again for playing “Where in the world is Carra Riley.”

The winner with a total of 64 points was Karen Connell from Erie, Colorado

Karen was posting on many pictures and sharing on the facebook wall.  She took advantage of the double points at the end and came on strong!

Thank you so much Karen,  your support was monumental!

2nd place: Becky with 25 points

3rd place: Ruth with 18 points

4th place: Joy with 13 points

Karen is going to one of the seven wonders of the world, the Grand Canyon and Williams, Arizona!

7 wonders of the world

Photo image courtesy of Bob Ribokas

Williams, Arizona IS an International melting pot with visitors coming from all over the world as it is the “Gateway” to one of the SEVEN natural  wonders of the world, the Grand Canyon.  Williams is where I live!

The Winner will receive

My vision of the trip for the experience was three fold.

  1. Learning how we are connected globally, what the outcomes of this connection are and how we can be a positive force in this process as we go “glocal”.
  2. Bring back the message from around the GLOBE on how we can better serve those coming to visit our country and specifically our local Williams, Arizona community.
  3. The contestants can ALL take the information they are sharing and then implement those ideas in their community.

I took pencils and pens to Vietnam from Williams, Arizona and enjoyed giving them to the YMCA of VietNam.  The local Williams Newspaper did a nice article on the connection so the “Thinking Global, Acting Local” vision came together!

I gleaned some RULES of the world on the voyage: the Taj rule from the Taj Mahal in India and the 18 mile rule in Brazil, on the Amazon.  The vision of seeing the world to think global to and act local is coming together.  Every county gave me wonderful content to connect the dots around the world.

Thank you again to all the participants for your encouragement and support on my voyage around the world!  You ROCKED my world! Namaste!

 

Everything Happens For A Reason! Rule of the 2 R’s™

Where are you supposed to be?  Thinking Global, Acting Local, going “glocal”  with the  “Real Reason Rule ™.”

Do you appreciate the concept that everything happens for a reason? I am a firm believer in this philosophy and know all our experiences are directed from a higher source. When going through something, many times it might not be until you get in the middle of it do you see the “real reason” something transpired. Our global lesson proved this theory showing how the “Real Reason Rule™” is always applicable.

My husband Tom and I have been on a journey around the world and in the middle of the South China Sea we got a call from family letting us know that his 92 year old mother had been admitted to the hospital with pneumonia. Serious thoughts of guilt began to rise as we thought about her original concern with us taking the trip at her age. Gertrude, Tom’s mother, was not in bad health when we left so we felt that 104 days should not be a problem and we proceeded with our plans.  We had driven to Colorado from Arizona for Thanksgiving prior to embarking on our January voyage to say our personal goodbyes and hopefully made her feel better about the trip.

Upon receiving the news about his mother, Tom checked in frequently with his sister, about his mother’s condition.  Gertrude improved and was moved to a re-hab facility which was good news for all of us. The news of the tsunami and earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011 was also starting to undermine the thoughts of everyone on the ship including our family watching the news and knowing we were very close in the China Sea. The only news coming through on the satellite to the ship was the Aljzeera network which continually repeated the bad news about the global disaster in Japan.  Prior to the incident in Japan we did not have any news at all on the TV so getting to catch up through the broadcast was helpful as we processed what was going on in the world around us as we gradually approached Japan.

The decision was made by the trip organizers to cancel the stop in Japan and change the last port before Hilo, Hawaii to Taiwan. Tom and I started to think about how his mother loved looking forward to visits from us so we decided that disembarking after Hong Kong and Shanghi then going to Colorado to be with her might help the healing process.  We e-mailed and called our daughter in Arizona and a friend in Colorado asking for help with trip plans as the Internet service on the ship was not working well and we wanted to take action immediately.  All of the flights leaving Hong Kong on the short notice were going though Japan and that global stop was not an option. Our daughter booked us a flight leaving from Shanghi direct to Los Angeles. Nineteen hours later we were in Phoenix, Arizona on solid ground, happy to be in the United States of America.  The fifteen hour time change was quite an adjustment as we crossed the international dateline and had the opportunity to live March 30th twice.

There were several reasons we decided to disembark from the journey early.

  1. Tom’s 92 year old mother was in re-hab after contracting pneumonia.
  2. The Japan disaster was a looming danger which caused some concern for our family.
  3. The ports of call on the trip were almost complete.  Having lived in Maui, Hawaii for three years, the last stop in Hilo was just extending the voyage time.
  4. 21 more days of crossing the Pacific was not going to add to our Global knowledge as the international cultural engagement had been completed.
  5. My head needed to re-boot with all the global experiences before I could accurately write about the lessons and rules that unfolded in each country.

To our friends who indicated that 104 days on the ocean might be too much, you were right! We were so happy to see the sign “Welcome to the United States of America” and Welcome to Los Angeles.

Why is she explaining all this you may be asking? To share how this global activity shaped our local experience in allowing us to travel back to Colorado and be where we needed to be for two very important reasons we were not aware of at the time we made the reservations.  Everything happens for a reason and the “Real Reason Rule™” became clear after this adventure.

Five days after making the decision to disembark, while still on the ship we had a call from the son of a close family friend. His mother had passed away and they were having the services on April 8, 2011.  I was able to assure him that we would be there and would be able to help with anything that needed to be completed.  He was so appreciative that we would be able to attend and be there with his family.

Seven days after we had decided to leave and still on the ship, our daughter in Phoenix called, very upset as she had totaled her car in an accident. She was not hurt but frightened and needed the support of her family. We had made arrangements for her to fly to Colorado to see her grandmother as we were going to drive and she could not take off more than a weekend. We were all together this past weekend and it was a healing event for everyone as we were all together,  able to make plans for the future and move upward with our thoughts supporting one another.

The celebration of life service for our family friend of thirty years, Cindee Murphy, helped me continue in mental growth about life and it’s meaning. Cindee’s son Kip delivered a memorial speech emphasizing the hyphen between the dates of her birth July 17, 1943 and her death March 27, 2011.  Creative writing has been going on  in my consciousness while working on a chapter about the meaning of a persons “dash.”  Several new ideas connected as he spoke so lovingly of his mother.  The family had Santana and Pink Floyd playing as they flashed photos of her life on the two big screens.  I was moved beyond description as I saw my picture included in the family treasures. The photos initiated thinking about all our experiences and how she would be missed then my thoughts turned to the higher meaning of her life and what she gave to us and what we gave to her.  Cindee Murphy’s dash made a difference in the world.  She always completed her real estate business with unblemished ethics and set the bar for high standards in the industry.  We were  sounding boards for each other on ideas that were outside of the box and she was always respectful and kind in the way she responded.   Based on Cindee’s vision for the service, she had us dance out of the hall with Santana blaring thinking only happy thoughts of Love.

Creating letters to friends and relatives upon passing is something I had only seen in movies and read about in books. I had never experienced receiving a letter from anyone I knew who had passed.  Cindee’s son brought me a letter she had written to me along with a beautiful red bag that contained two hand beaded, purple necklaces and bracelets Cindee had made especially for me.  I wept as I read the letter and will only share one sentence Cindee wrote to me:  ” ….you gave me one of the biggest gifts anyone has been able to give me.  That was to constantly reinforce my relationship and love with my son, Shawn.” Remembering conversations in the past helped me realize how  verbal exchange really does affect people and how important positive reinforcement is in our relationships.  I know I will take this lesson from Cindee and start to write letters to my friends and family NOW,  letting them know what they have done for me and how they have helped me with along the way. Hopefully, dear reader this might touch you and the “pay it forward concept” sharing how someone has helped you in the NOW makes a difference in their dash as well as yours.

Had we not made the arrangements to get off the ship early we would have missed this once in a lifetime opportunity to share with family and friends the celebration of life of a very special individual, Cindee Murphy.  I am so grateful to have learned the “real reason rule™” and realize how important it is to listen and then respond accordingly when ideas come, as everything does happen for a reason.

We were able to be where we needed to be and did not know the “real reason” to disembark until we had already made plans to leave. Tom’s mother was recovering beautifully and two families who really needed support, received our love and physical presence because we listened and believed that everything happens for a reason.  Taking this global lesson and applying it to local situations makes this glocal lesson the “real reason rule™.

The contest, Where in the world is Carra Riley is still active and will continue as originally outlined until April 24, 2011.  New photos are being posted on facebook and flickr daily along with  youtube videos of the port adventures. Double points are available on some venues so jump in or keep playing, the game is still on! Winner for prizes to see one of the seven wonders of the world will be announced May 13, 2011.

Lessons From The Taj Mahal Glocal #8

Thinking Global, Acting Local “The Taj Rule™’  Glocal #8

The Taj Mahal has been considered one of the Seven Wonders of the World. I felt my breath get short as my eyes continued on a journey down the reflecting pool to see white marble structure I had only read about my entire life.

The Taj Mahal is widely measured as one of the most beautiful buildings in the world and stands as a symbol of eternal love. It is situated on the right bank of river Yamuna. Words fall short in trying to describe the feeling that is experienced with the beauty of the architecture. The building is actually a mausoleum built by Shah Jahan who was grief-stricken after the death of Mumtaz Mahal, his third wife. She died delivering their 14th child at the age of 39. The building was started in 1632 and was completed in 1653, employing thousands of artisans and craftsmen.

The Taj Mahal is the biggest attraction in India drawing between 2 million and 4 million visitors annually. I took this global experience and started thinking about the “building of love.” The Taj Mahal is a tribute to Sha Jahan’s wife and to God. The main structure of the Taj is square but has unique beveled corners so there are no sharp edges. I pondered the concept of beveling the edges to soften the concept of this building of love. I then started to compare the idea of rounding out the edges of any relationship to come from a higher level of communication based on love using the Taj Mahal concept as a guide. The idea can be used with local groups, communities, business and individuals. It is a global concept that can be applied locally to make a difference in our ever changing world. Simply stated it is “softening speech or communication” to work through issues in a loving manner with NO sharp edges.

The structure of the dome is designed as a replica of God’s throne in paradise, where the huge pearl dome stands supported by four corner pillars. The entrance gate of the Taj bears inscription of chapter 89 of the Quran. It is called “Al Fajra” or day break. The entire structure is decorated with designs of flowers. The cenotaphs are adorned with stone inlay called “pietra dura.” There are over 35 different types of precious and semi-precious stone from all over the world that have been used for the inlay work which enhances the message of love. Think about how the work to create this tribute of love took almost twenty-two years to complete. The idea of such a love is hard to process and has not been duplicated in a similar concept anywhere in the world.

Sixty-four gardens of sixteen flowerbeds with 400 plants each line the entry through the Charbagh garden which is a symbolic representation of “a garden of Paradise.” This beautiful entry frames the most outstanding construction of a building with perfect symmetry in the world.

No trip to India would be complete without having experienced the beauty of the Taj Mahal.

Take a journey of the slide show and think about those softened edges on the world’s most renowned building representing love. Think about easy it will be to take this global concept and apply it to local relationships and groups by simply “softening edges” in communication and sharing. Could we be “building relationships” with love and respect when “The Taj Rule™” is applied in our behavior? Simply rounding out the rough sharp edges can make a difference in actions when applying this “glocal rule.”

It has been said that discovering the secrets of the Taj is like discovering the different moods of a woman. The evening sheds a different look with the reflections of the fiery inlayed stones sparkling in the setting sun.

This timeless wonder of the Taj Mahal can now be a practical global concept that can make a difference in local experiences by applying “TheTaj Rule™ “ Building communities and relationships with love and softening the delivery of communication by taking away the “sharp” tones of criticism, judgment and condemnation. I will be listening for the giggles as readers process this concept and then apply it at a meeting. Thinking Global and Acting Local….. going glocal with “The Taj Rule™.”

There is still time to “Get in the game“. Win a travel voucher and great prizes to one of the seven wonders of the world, the Grand Canyon where you can stay and play in Williams, Arizona This is an exciting opportunity to experience a town that embraces its visitors and wants to create a memorable experience that you will want to write about.  Thinking global and acting local.

What is with your orange? Glocal #7


Welcome to Day one on the voyage for “Connecting The Dots Around The World.”

“How can this be?” you may be asking as today is actually the 52nd day of travel on the MV Explorer.  Mental transformation proceeds on different paths with each individual and it has taken me this much time to process the information and share it in a way that makes sense and will have a positive impact as we “Think Global and Act Local”  going “Glocal.” To prepare for a mid-voyage review I took a step back to review where we came from and compare where we are, setting the first day stage:

“Anxious whispers filled the room in the student union as voyagers anticipated the key note address for the Spring 2011 voyage of Semester At Sea. The thought of 104 days on the open seas, engaging with people in communities all over the world was daunting.  How would I know what messages to listen to? How would I decipher all the visual and audio stimulation I which I would experience and use it as a learning tool?  How will I know if I “Get It?”  What will I feel?  Will the dots connect?  Will the puzzle pieces fit?  These are questions swimming through the minds of many on the ship so the importance of the initial message was one that would set the tone and expectations for the passage.”

C.Y. Tung,  one of the visionaries behind Semester At Sea said, “Ships can carry more than cargo. They can carry ideas.”

To that end I embarked upon a global path with no obligations, no stress and a total open mind to absorb and engage in stimulating conversation to help connect the dots around the world. Completely void of any ties or worries, produced an environment perfect for a type of “scientific research” where were no external factors that could obscure the message. My mind was an open book ready to write the chapters after each port or life changing event.  The bar of expectations for the experience on the ship was at the very top level.  The marketing “hooks” had me ready, hook, line and sinker for somewhat of a utopia in travel and education.  The superiority of the instructors, the course selections, the student body composition, the quality of the ship itself all were framed in marketing perfection.  I drank the Kool-Aid and was ready for the ride to become “grounded at sea.”

Rosalyn Berne, Vice President of Academic Affairs for the Institute for Shipboard Education and Semester at Sea, spoke to the Spring 2011 voyage participants about embracing the newness of everything and what we were about to experience. She asked us to close our eyes and visualize…….

“Pretend you have one orange and there is one orphan child looking at you on a bench, you start to open the orange…… what are you going to do with the orange?  Now 7 orphan children appear…  again the question arises, what are you going to do with the orange… as you break off one section.. a hundred orphans show up… what will you do?”

Pregnant pause…. that was it, she was done and the next speaker was walking to the stage.

“What is up with your orange?” will be the theme and deep question to ponder throughout the voyage for me.  The sensation in my stomach after her speech was something I was not prepared for as I had no clue what I would do with my orange. Originally thoughts of sharing the orange popped into my head but once the 100 orphans came out I became uncomfortable in my thoughts as the reality of world hunger started to set in. The question then arose about my one orange and what I could do to help.  We have encountered hundreds of hungry children on this voyage so far and the answer to the questions seems to change or evolve after each port.  It will be interesting to compare ideas on how to “Connect The Dots Around The World” once the voyage is totally complete.

Going back to the orientation event, potent information was provided by Dean Dan Garvey describing the hypothesis of why some of us were on the ship.

  • Some are here to meet people and travel.
  • Some people see life as a great charm bracelet and want the charm that says “I sailed around the world.”
  • Some are just getting out of relationships and some want in a relationship.
  • Some are here because their sorority or fraternity said it was a good thing to do.
  • Some are trying to answer “WHO AM I?” and where do I fit in.

Out of nowhere we hear the clear sound of one note ringing in the auditorium.  The addition of a second note peaks our interest, then many notes just hap hazard are being played with no association.  The notes then evolve into a beautiful melody, setting the tone of “harmony” which is ultimately one of the goals for the voyage according to Dean Dan.

“Take aways” from the orientation included the fact responsibility comes along with this adventure if we accept it. We are the custodians of our stories both the successes and the regrets.

I created the Dean Dan Top Ten list from the ship orientation speech.

  1. Traveling around the world is an opportunity to be one of the most transformational times of life.
  2. It can also be an opportunity for huge regret if one misses doing things or experiences for growth in exchange for momentary instant gratification.
  3. Let the experience to light a fire to become a positive influence on the world.
  4. Become a citizen of this planet without regret.
  5. Never say, I wish I had listened, I wish I had spent a little less time at the Hilton.
  6. Adults have been coaching you since you were little, you know what to do, just do it.
  7. Make sure you have no regrets.
  8. Look forward to the unknown opportunities.
  9. Don’t be a distraction to others who want to learn.
  10. Honor everyone else who is here.

The orange messed with my mind or should I describe it as “stimulated contemplation.” The orange has been the topic of many conversations on the voyage as we individually figure out what to do with that fruit.  The door of thought was opened but no directions were given or alluded to including what could potentially happen if you turn right or left in thought so it is up to the “thinker” to figure out how all the dots connect and the ultimate outcome for the orange. The ship is filled with “serious thinkers in the form of both students and educators” which gives a good cross section of some of the most brilliant minds in the country. The voyage has turned out to be more of an “independent study” instead of a community project. Having access to the intellectual resources is making the journey an easy place to learn.  Each individual is learning or absorbing the lessons from around the world at their own pace and under their own terms.

Several insightful ideas came from posting the orange question on facebook:

  • Eat the orange and plant the seeds.
  • Take the orphans to the orange tree itself.
  • Pray, like the loaves, fishes and wine to feed the multitude.
  • Eat the orange and run.
  • Make juice.
  • Teach the orphans how to plant an orchard.

Contemplating the orange, opened thought for new ideas like, connecting the dash in life with specific purpose. Could it be the “dash” on the tombstone showing the material start and end of a life answers what you did with your orange?  Does discovering passion in your dash evolve into “Who Am I” and what did I do to make the world a better place?
Is there a right or wrong answer? Do you share the orange, give it all to one, eat the orange, plant the seeds, graft a tree, create juice or run away?  There are certainly many choices of what to do with the one orange. What is right for one individual might not be right for another.  It really does not matter what your answer is because, your dash, is your dash and you have control over what you do in life to make a difference in the world.

Connecting the dots around the world with global ideas that can be implemented at the local levels is what “Glocal” lessons are all about.

What are you going to do with your orange?

What difference can be made in individual communities?  How can others be encouraged to help with local issues?  The world is a big place and the backyard is a step away.

Going Glocal, connecting our local communities with global lessons.

Glocal #6 Part 2 Lesson of the Omelet

Glocal Lesson Of The Omelets Part 1

The rest of the story….not having a camera available for the “photo op” at the omelet bar in Nassau where I experienced part 1 of the lesson of the omelets led me to re-create the situation at a later date to have digital images for the “glocal” moment. While staying in the rain forest on the Amazon above Manaus, Brazil the opportunity arose to capture the “lesson of the omelet” in the Amazon Eco Park at the breakfast buffet. The photo of the omelet with the man behind the stove possibly shows the sentiment of some of the residents along with the local actions reported in a newspaper article. You can be the judge of the lesson of the lesson of the omelet in Manaus, Brazil.

It has taken me some time to publish this post as I was not sure how to represent the other side of “Connecting The Dots Around The World.” When I embarked on this journey around the world, I had some kind of “Polly Anna” idea that there would be some mystic revelations and everything would be positive and would write as PF Kluge shared in a Global Studies class on the ship “Happy Yappy” reports. PF Kluge is an instructor on thevoyage around the world and has been described on his website as “Novelist, journalist, professor: a trifecta, a hat trick, a trinity.” He tells it like it is and minces no words. He co-authored the “Life” magazine article that was the basis of the movie “Dog Day Afternoon.”

After some deep contemplation of the experience in Manaus it appeared as though there are mixed messages from the government vs. the people. Manaus had to hire security and 5 extra agents to be “present” by the dock as the ship community walked around. An article indicating “Students Pay $300 Per Day To Learn About The World” can’t be located online in the January 25, 2011 Amazonas em Tempo newspaper. The Newspaper article was shared in a journalism class on the ship as the students had to bring articles in from the ports to discuss in class. Where did the online article go?  Could it be that public sentiment might not be what Brazil should be publishing with the current world events coming to the country?  What did that headline say to the people of Manaus?  According to a text book we are using on the ship for our daily global studies class “Atlas of Global Development” a poverty map indicates 10 to 24% of the population in Brazil lives on less than $1.25 per day?

It appears as through Brazil is working hard to change the past image with street violence and life in the favelas.

Our group had different Manaus experiences with street people attempting to take jewelry right off the neck of a lifelong learner.

Several students were bitten or scratched by monkey’s and had to have rabbi shots after being attacked in the lobby of a hotel with pet monkey’s running around.

There was an encounter with a stalker following a group of three women. Nothing happened as the man went off after being confronted, however, it appeared as though he had a gun under his shirt in his back pocket as he walked away.

A student shared an incident where a bus driver took the long way around back to town which included an unscheduled stop for lunch and an accident dragging a woman on the ground as the bus took off where he then had to get off the bus and get on a different bus as the bus driver took the woman to the hospital.

Five days in Manaus, Brazil seemed like a long time when one of the University officials on the ship indicated in a pre-port lecture, 2 days was enough for Manaus.

Our visit might have been a beta test for things to come in Brazil. One newspaper article reports: “As Brazil prepares to host the 2016 Olympics and the 2014 World Cup, the country expects nothing short of an urban renaissance.”

Brazil is preparing for The world cup in Manaus in four years and in eight years Rio will host the Olympics.

The PR blitz has started and it appeared as we could have been the recipients of practice for the future. In describing preparations for the arrival of the MV Explorer, the local paper, “A Critical,” expressed the fact the Military Police had security and five agents to monitor activities at the port. They also referred to the ship as a “luxury hotel” could this  have possibly been an indication of the “back story” of the Brazilian attitudes about the visitors with the need for protection along with the interesting description of the ship.

The Newspaper article from “A Critical”  was in Portuguese.

“O navio está em Manaus desde a manhã de ontem, e os visitantes foram recepcionados por um grupo de dança folclórica. ‘Estaremos à disposição dos estudantes’, informou o diretor de turismo da Amazonastur, Jordan Gouvêa. Em Manaus, o grupo de universitários terá segurança garantida pela Polícia Militar, que destacou cinco agentes para acompanhar as atividades no porto.

Translated to English:

“The ship is in Manaus since yesterday morning, and visitors were greeted by a folk dance group. ‘We will be available to students,’ the tourism director of AmazonasTur, Jordan Gouvea. In Manaus, the group of students will have security provided by the Military Police, said that five agents to monitor activities at the port. “

More in Portuguese:

“Liberdade de escolha A coordenadora de extensão Debbie Clifford foi quem levou a equipe de A CRÍTICA para conhecer o navio, que mais parece um hotel de luxo e cuja língua oficial é o inglês. ‘A viagem dura 104 dias, portanto tem de tudo aqui’, explicou, contando que no MV Explorer há desde salas de aula, até um deck com piscina, além de refeitórios e quartos. Em solo amazônico, os alunos terão por volta de 35”\

English translation:

“Freedom of choice The extension coordinator Debbie Clifford was the one who led the team of A CRITICAL to meet the ship, which looks more like a luxury hotel and whose official language is English. “The trip lasts 104 days, so it has everything here,” he said, noting that since the MV Explorer for classrooms up to a deck with swimming pool, and dining areas and bedrooms. In Amazonian soil, students will have around 35 activities.”

Connecting the lesson of the Omelet, taking the global thinking to local action, going glocal.

Before docking at our first port, a camera etiquette lesson was provided to the ship community emphasizing  the importance of requesting permission to take photos in the countries we were visiting. Being a respectful student, the omelet man at the Amazon Eco Park was asked if it would be possible to photograph an omelet prior to actually taking the picture. He indicated it would be ok and stepped back from the omelet pan. The photo was taken quickly to get out of the way. When the photos was being cropped the real sentiment of the worker in Brazil at the Amazon Eco Park became evident with his hand gesture.

The article along with the local comments online indicate the feelings of the community. Thinking global and acting local, this representation of the community is a reminder that people are watching what a community does to respond to visitors.

Visitors look at what is going on in an area, what is being written in the newspaper and then make their decisions as to what direction they will take with coming back or sharing the experience with friends.

Learning from the omelet maker in Nassau and the gentleman above shows the WORLD his feelings. The action has an effect on how a visitors perceive the area.

The Amazon Eco Lodge rain forest jungle experience was all good! We had a very knowledgeable guide and pleasant memories. We learned how to survive with water from a parasite root, create poison darts from palm tree spikes an special moss along with making fire torches from the sap of a camphor tree. Our guide was delightful, he loved his land and shared that with us. We caught a piranha and one of the guides caught a caiman alligator so we had a great Amazon rain forest experience. Would I tell someone to visit to Manaus, Brazil?  You be the judge!

The “glocal” lesson of the omelet is to embrace those visiting your community anywhere in the world with kindness and respect. Everyone in the community needs to be on board as the message is coming across loud and clear.  Community involvement and individual dedication to the economic survival of the area or even an individual business is a must to change perceptions and attract new immersion from those testing the waters and looking to see what the location has to offer.

Remember, the actions within a community express the attitude of your environment. Be like the omelet lady from Nassau. Embrace all visitors with appreciation for their participation in your community if you want the local area to grow and prosper together.

Don’t forget to “Get in the game” as there is plenty of time. Win a travel voucher and great prizes to one of the seven wonders of the world. This is an exciting opportunity to experience  Williams, Arizona, The Gateway to the Grand Canyon, a town that embraces its visitors and wants to create a memorable experience so you will be sure to tell your friends about the Grand Canyon and all it’s grandeur.